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Listed below:  Kathryn Brogan - Linda Formichelli - Debbie Ridpath Ohi - Arlene Uslander


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Freelance Editor and former editor of Writer's Market, Writer's Market Deluxe Edition...

Interview (by Beryl Hall Bray) excerpt from WOW WomenOnWriting.com
 
 
Kathryn S. Brogan

Katie Brogan is a Freelance Editor and former editor of Writer's Market, Writer's Market Deluxe Edition, and Guide to Literary Agents. She was also the associate editor of Writer's Digest magazine, and the executive editor of Publishing Success, a special interest publication focusing on self-publishing and electronic-publishing.
      Mrs. Brogan is a graduate of the
University of Dayton with a degree in English and concentrations in English literature, journalism, and women's studies.
      She is an accomplished speaker and also a published freelance writer whose nonfiction has appeared in Cincinnati Women Magazine, Writer's Digest, Novel & Short Story Writer's Market, and The Complete Handbook for Novel Writers.
      Katie lives in
Cincinnati with her husband, Jeff, and their son, Ryan.

 

BERYL: How did you get to the role of Editor? Did you begin as a writer, or did editing grab you from the beginning?

 

KATIE: I’ve always been very passionate about the English language and the written word, so publishing has always been a natural fit for me. While I always wanted to be a writer, I quickly learned that being a full-time writer doesn’t always pay the bills--which is why I turned to editing as a career. I think I’ll always have the dream of being a writer; I just need to find the time and resources to make that happen.

How are editing and writing very different skill sets?

There are many wonderful editors, who are also wonderful writers, but the majority of editors edit and writers write. Editors have to be very critical of manuscripts because they know that it takes more than just a good idea to sell a manuscript.

What makes the good editors good?

Good editors are good because they understand the publishing industry, they know how to work well with writers, and they know the difference between a good manuscript and a fantastic manuscript.

What would be the most significant advice you could give a new writer?

I am not sure if I can give "significant" advice, but I can tell writers that it is important to have a good salable idea that you passionately believe in, and then write the manuscript. Make sure you understand the mechanics of grammar and that you learn to ruthlessly edit your manuscript before you submit it.

 

How did you get to the role of Editor? Did you begin as a writer, or did editing grab you from the beginning?

 

I’ve always been very passionate about the English language and the written word, so publishing has always been a natural fit for me. While I always wanted to be a writer, I quickly learned that being a full-time writer doesn’t always pay the bills--which is why I turned to editing as a career. I think I’ll always have the dream of being a writer; I just need to find the time and resources to make that happen.

 


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Magazine writer, Author, Speaker, and Teacher

“Hi, Beryl, I saw the interview with me on WOW today. It looks awesome! So professional-looking. Thanks for the opportunity! ... Thanks again, Linda”
 
Interview (by Beryl Hall Bray) excerpt from WOW WomenOnWriting.com
 
Linda Formichelli

Linda Formichelli has written for more than 120 magazines and is the co-author of The Renegade Writer: A Totally Unconventional Guide to Freelance Writing Success and The Renegade Writer's Query Letters That Rock. She also teaches an e-course on breaking into magazines and offers e-books on writing topics, including Editors Unleashed: Magazine Editors Growl About Their Writer Peeves.

 

BERYL: You say you wear more hats than my old aunt Millie. Give us a thumbnail sketch of what makes up Linda Formichelli's professional life.

 

LINDA: Well, I'm a big proponent of diversifying, so I do all kinds of writing and writing-related work:  magazine articles, books, corporate writing, e-courses on getting published in magazines, and e-mentoring.

      I see that a lot of these questions have to do with my full plate, so let me preface them by saying that the amount I do of each type of work varies. I don't go full-out on all these things! For example, I do only the rare copywriting gig these days, though I'd like to get back into it. And just six months ago I was doing mostly health writing, and now I'm doing more articles on business and marketing. It's always in flux.

 

What was the first hat you put on? How did you break into that field?

 

It was magazine writing. I got my master's degree in Slavic linguistics, but then discovered that there wasn't much call for Slavic linguists in the job market (who knew?), so after grad school I thought I'd try a career in publishing. I went on several informational interviews, where I interviewed publishing execs to find out if this was the career for me. It wasn't, but I thought that my experiences in informational interviewing would make a great article for a career magazine. I got a copy of Writer's Market and a book on writing query letters, wrote up my very first query, and sent it to several pubs (which I had never actually read). The article idea sold to EEO Bimonthly magazine for $500!

       A mini rant:  When I think about that, I'm amazed at the number of writers out there now busting their butts writing keyword articles for five bucks a pop to get experience or clips. Don't be taken in by website owners and editors who say you have to write for free or cheap to break in! If I got $500 for my very first article -- ten years ago, with a 1200-baud modem and no clue -- other writers should be able to break into paying magazines without writing keyword articles (which no print magazine editor takes seriously as a clip anyway) for free or peanuts. I understand that the industry changes, but there are still tons and tons of respectable, paying magazines out there. Some writers insist that they can pound out a $5 article in ten minutes, but really, (1) is that your best work? and (2) if you can write a $5 article in 10 minutes, you can probably create a $500 article in two hours (which is what I do in some cases). That's more than four dollars per minute. Rant over.

 

Some of our readers may be doing well in one or two areas, but have a real itch to try something else. However, when they start to consider adding another dimension an old adage, “Don't spread yourself too thin” may run through their minds. How can they identify if it is too much?

 

I think it's different for every person -- and believe me, you'll know when it's too much! For me, when I want to do more of a thing, I naturally tend to cut down on others. For example, after my career got off the ground, I decided to concentrate on magazines, so I naturally stopped marketing myself as a corporate writer.     

      Several months ago I wanted to do more business articles, so as I got caught up in that I let up on querying the health and women's markets. It's great to be a freelancer because you can do that. You can test the waters instead of having to do everything full out.

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